Looking for things to do in Hendersonville, NC? Whether you’re a local or just passing through we’ve got loads of great tips and events to help you find your perfect adventure.

Friday, January 28, 2022
2022 School Garden Grants Available
Jan 28 all-day
online

Extension Master GardenerSM Volunteers of Buncombe County are happy to announce that for the fifteenth year we are offering School Garden Grants to Asheville City and Buncombe County public schools, including state charter schools.

Extension Master Gardener instructs student in vegetable gardening.

Student learns vegetable gardening

We provide a notice of the application period along with instructions to all school principals, elementary through senior high. Additional information is available on our website page, 2022 School Garden Grants, where you can learn more about the guidelines for receiving a grant and get online access to the 2022 School Garden Grants Application.

All applications must be completed online. Completed applications will be accepted beginning January 7, 2022, and must be submitted no later than 9 p.m. on February 5, 2022. If you have any questions, please call the Extension Office at 828-255-5522.

We are proud of our partnership with Asheville City and Buncombe County Schools. Since 2007, we have awarded 44 School Garden Grants totaling over $45,000. These grants have involved more than 16,500 students and hundreds of teachers, parents, and community volunteers.

School gardens grow more than plants. They grow imagination and creativity. They make math and science come alive, and they build community. We hope your school will join us in 2022.

Guidelines for 2022 School Garden Grants can be found at 2022 School Garden Grants (buncombemastergardener.org)

Beekeeping School 2022
Jan 28 all-day
Henderson County Center - NC Extension

The Henderson County Beekeepers Association (HCBA) is pleased to announce the schedule for their 2022 Beekeeping School. This is one of this region’s most extensive beekeeping courses consisting of 7 classroom sessions and up to 6, but at least 2 apiary sessions (weather dependent) with over a dozen instructors from the southeast. The course objective is to prepare you to successfully care for your bees during the first year of beekeeping. The $75 fee includes a textbook, course materials, and one-year Family membership in HCBA. Those completing the class and planning to become spring 2022 beekeepers are encouraged to take advantage of HCBA’s unique mentor program. Mentors make themselves available to ‘hands-on’ support and coach those completing this course during the critical first year of beekeeping.

The class is held every Monday evening for 7 consecutive weeks beginning January 10, 2022, from 7 to 9 p.m. on Zoom and either at Henderson County Extension Office in Jackson Park or Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, 455 Research Drive in Mills River, North Carolina depending on how many people would like to meet live.
To begin enrollment in HCBA’s 2022 Bee School head over to https:/hcbeekeepers.org/ or call 828-233-5623

Continuum Art Market
Jan 28 2022 – Jan 7 2023 all-day
Continuum Art Gallery

[HENDERSONVILLE, NC, Saturday, September 4th, 2021]
On the first Saturday of each month, Continuum Art hosts an art market to showcase local artists and makers. Ranging in mediums from paintings, to textiles, to jewelry, you’re guaranteed to find something you love! Each market also hosts live music and local caterers. A free, family-friendly event and a great way to check out our space and upcoming events. Visit us from 12-5pm on September 4th!
If you’re interested in vending at one of our art markets, email [email protected] or DM on Instagram @continuumgallerync

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library
Jan 28 all-day
online

History @ Home – Visit Virtually Western North Carolina Historical Association
Jan 28 all-day
online w/ Western North Carolina Historical Association
Deep Dive into Archives is a living exhibit shining a light on the individuals who were once enslaved at the Smith-McDowell House through primary documentation.

 

 

 

Douglas Ellington: Asheville’s Boomtown Architect presents a look at Ellington’s iconic Asheville creations along with other buildings he completed throughout his career in other cities.
HillBilly Land explores the power, prevalence, and persistence of the hillbilly stereotype from the days of its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present day.
In 1918 vs 2020, we take an in-depth look at the 1918 influenza epidemic in Western North Carolina through newspaper clippings, advertisements, ephemera, photographs, and oral history and place the events of 1918 into context with our present-day response to the coronavirus pandemic.
Online Education Programs with The Preservation Society of Asheville + Buncombe County
Jan 28 all-day
online

The Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County (PSABC) was formed in 1976, with interest in preservation sparked by observance of the U. S. Bicentennial, and in response to threats to local buildings and sites posed by neglect, insensitive alteration, and large-scale transportation projects. Disinvestment in downtown, plans for the open cut through Beaucatcher Mountain, and a proposal to turn Montford Avenue into a through street connecting to U.S.19-23 spurred formation of the volunteer group, which quickly incorporated and initiated work as a community non-profit.

Online Education Programs

South Asheville Cemetery by Anne Chesky Smith

From Mountain Crafts to Arts and Crafts by Bruce Johnson

It happened on Chiles Avenue by James Vaughn

and more

SAHC YouTube Channel
Jan 28 all-day
online
Did you know that we have a YouTube Channel?

If you are unable to attend our virtual programs, please know that we record them and upload them to our SAHC YouTube Channel. Be sure to subscribe to our channel so you know when we have new content to share.

Check out this 10 minute video that highlights our active management and conservation work in the Highlands of Roan.

Snow in Your Landscape: Do’s and Don’ts
Jan 28 all-day
online

When it snows, gardeners may rejoice that a blanket of the cold stuff serves as welcome insulation during frosty weather, protecting plants from wind damage and moderating soil temperature. Of course, snow—and ice—are sometimes more destructive than helpful. Plan how to take advantage of snow’s benefits and minimize potential damage.

Tie up branches of evergreens with multiple leaders to prevent this kind of damage!

Things to do before a storm
If forecasters predict several inches of snow, preventing harm to your landscaping is easier than dealing with the aftermath.

  • Mark where your yard ends and the street begins. Putting up snow stakes may prevent snowplow damage to your street-side plantings. You can purchase commercial stakes or make your own from rebar or pressure-treated 1-inch by 1-inch wooden stakes painted orange. For our area, stakes 3 feet tall are tall enough—bury them 8- to 12-inches deep.
  • You may want to mark the location of garden paths or sidewalks to facilitate clearing them after the storm and to avoid inadvertently treading on your plantings.
  • If you have particularly vulnerable shrubs or trees, tying up branches or constructing shelters may help prevent breakage. Better yet, consider resistance to snow and ice damage when selecting trees and shrubs for your landscape (see list of more and less resistant tree species, below).
  • Think twice about using deicers before or after a storm—particularly salt-based ones—to avoid poisoning plants (see additional information about the benefits and risks of specific ice melters, below).

Minimizing damage after a storm
Your landscape may come through a storm unscathed but if not, take care to avoid causing even more damage to your plants or yourself!

  • Be careful about trying to remove snow or ice from trees and shrubs.
    • Often it is best to leave snow or ice to melt on its own.
    • Never stand under a snow or ice laden tree—branches may break unexpectedly!
    • Shaking a tree to remove snow can do more harm than good.
    • Don’t try to remove snow using downward brushing. Rather, try reaching underneath branches from a distance with a broom or pole to dislodge snow.
  • Avoid shoveling snow onto your plantings. In addition to the weight of the snow, you may be adding soil, grit, and/or gravel to your beds.
  • Consult an arborist about whether you can save severely damaged trees: https://www.treesaregood.org/findanarborist/arboristsearch 
  • Use proper pruning techniques to remove damaged branches on trees and shrubs; see first link below for more resources about pruning and other management issues.
Leave snow and ice on young trees that bend because they can often recover by themselves when the snow and ice melt.
Shoveled snow often contains material you do not want in your planting beds!
Severely damaged trees may require removal or extensive pruning.

Take time to dream!
Be sure to survey your landscape during and after a storm, not only to prevent or repair winter damage, but to evaluate where you might add winter interest in future years, and what new projects you’ll undertake this spring, summer, and fall. Happy year-round gardening!

Article by Buncombe County Extension Master GardenerSMVolunteers

Student Poetry Contest – “Ambition”
Jan 28 all-day
online

January through April

Actors performing Sandburg's works on stageActors portray characters from Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Story “Three Boys with Jugs of Molasses and Secret Ambitions.”

NPS Photo

Educators in grades 3-12 are invited to submit original poems written by their students in February. The poems will be judged and winners announced in April. Find the 2022 Poetry Contest Information and submission guidelines here. The theme “Ambition” is from one of Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, to celebrate it’s 100th year of being published. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.”

Students are invited to submit a poem to Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site’s annual Student Poetry Contest. The contest encourages youth to explore writing their own poetry, and is open to students nationwide!

Submissions are accepted from grades 3-12 and must be postmarked by March 1, 2022. See below for submission rules.

Winners will be notified by April 8, 2022, and will be invited to participate in a special virtual program on April 22.


2022 Contest Rules

Theme – “Ambition”
Carl Sandburg wrote millions of words reflecting on the American experience of the 20th century. Though his words often focused on war, labor, and social injustice, as a father of three, he also wrote imaginative, zany, and fantastical children’s stories, called “Rootabaga Stories.” Carl Sandburg’s “Rootabaga Stories” were first published in 1922 and celebrate 100 years of entertaining readers of all ages this year. The theme “Ambition” is from one of these stories. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.” Read the story here.

Poems submitted for the 2022 contest should reflect the theme of “Ambition.” By definition, a strong desire to do or to achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work. Or setting goals to achieve success.

Submission Rules

  • Poetry accepted from 3-12th grades only. Poems will be grouped for judging by 3-5th, 6-8th, and 9-12th.
  • Poems must be submitted by a teacher (traditional classroom or homeschool teacher).
  • No more than three poems per class. Teachers with multiple classes, can submit up to three poems per class period.
  • Poem will be judged on its ability to communicate the theme.
  • Poem can be written in any style, but must not exceed one-page in length. No illustrations.
  • Poems must be typed, no handwritten entries, using standard computer fonts, like Times, Arial, etc…
  • Do not place any identifying information (name, school, grade, etc…) on poem sheet, that will go on the accompanying submission form.
  • Submission form must be complete to be accepted:
    • Paperclipped to poem, no staples
    • Must be signed by parent, student and teacher
    • Submissions must be postmarked, faxed, or e-mailed to [email protected], by March 1, 2022. Emailed submissions must be docs, .pdfs or scans. Low resolution pictures of the submission will not be accepted.

Judging
Judges from the literary community will make the decision for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place within each grade category (3-5th, 6-8th, 9-12th).

Poetry Partners
The 2022 Poetry Contest is a result of tremendous community support including the Friends of Carl Sandburg at Connemara, and literary volunteers who serve as judges. Thank you.

Poetry Resources
You may also find curriculum resources to use in the classroom at the park’s website: www.nps.gov/carl/learn/education/index.htm.

Send Submissions to:
Carl Sandburg Home NHS
Attn: Poetry Contest
81 Carl Sandburg Lane
Flat Rock, North Carolina 28731
Fax 828-693-4179
Email: [email protected]

Volunteer at Spring Conference!
Jan 28 all-day
online
Volunteer at Spring Conference!
We work hard to make the Spring conference available to all. We’re excited to offer the opportunity to volunteer in exchange for a weekend and/or pre-conference pass. We truly couldn’t do this without our spectacular volunteers! Nearly 200 of you will make this conference a success.
We are still finalizing the volunteer opportunities available at the 2022 Spring Conference & Market and will be updating our volunteer page as soon as possible! In the meantime, please reach out to our Spring Conference Volunteer Coordinator at [email protected].
History @ Home – Visit Virtually
Jan 28 @ 9:00 am – 9:00 pm
online
Stories from the House is a virtual tour of our 1840s-era brick mansion as seen through the eyes of many of the people who walked these same hallways over a century ago and whose stories represent a microcosm of the history of western North Carolina.
In 1918 vs 2020, we take an in-depth look at the 1918 influenza epidemic in Western North Carolina through newspaper clippings, advertisements, ephemera, photographs, and oral history and place the events of 1918 into context with our present-day response to the coronavirus pandemic.
The South Asheville Cemetery was founded in the early 1800s as a burial ground for people who had been enslaved by the Smith family–the first family to live in what is currently known as the Smith-McDowell House, a c1840s brick mansion that is now our home.
MAGNETIC U SPEAK THE SPEECH Taught by Melon Wedick
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – Mar 19 @ 2:00 pm
Magnetic Theatre

Speak the Speech is an 8-week deep dive into the technical fundamentals that will allow you to speak Shakespeare with accuracy and clarity. Skills covered include:

  • Paraphrasing for accurate understanding
  • De-constructing and understanding Shakespeare’s grammar and syntax
  • Identifying operative phrases and key words to unlock the audience’s understanding
  • Physical and vocal techniques for clarity
  • Developing and deepening imagery
  • Using scansion to discover hints to pacing, character, and unwritten stage directions
  • Memorizing meaning rather than speech patterns, for flexible, spontaneous, and responsive performance

The first four weeks of this course focus on tools for comprehension and speech, with an emphasis on prose. The second four weeks move on to verse, combining skills from the first half of class with scansion and deeper image work.

Students who took an abbreviated version of the class in the fall of 2021 said:

“I gained a significant amount of information from it. The format was incredible and I have come away from it with a better understanding of Shakespeare.“

“Instructor’s knowledge, command of material, keen observational skills, and specific, articulate feedback made the class engaging and useful.”

“It was interesting to see the other people’s work evolve as they used the tools learned in class.”

“The two hours flew by and I often wished we could keep working past stop time.”

 

Ages 16 and Up

Bio for the Instructor:

Melon Wedick studied theatre (and philosophy!) at Oberlin College. She studied Shakespeare performance with Paul Moser and Hal Ryder, and was a founding member of the Certain Players (Randolph, VT) and founding co-director of the Greenville Shakespeare Festival (Greenville, NH). She has performed with the Certain Players, Greenville Shakespeare Festival (NH), Black River Theatre Company, Shakespeare NYC, and the Montford Park Players, among others, and has directed productions of Hamlet, Measure for Measure, and Coriolanus. Now the artistic director of Nemesis Theatre Company, Melon is passionate about clarity and comprehension in Shakespeare performance.

Saturday, January 29, 2022
2022 School Garden Grants Available
Jan 29 all-day
online

Extension Master GardenerSM Volunteers of Buncombe County are happy to announce that for the fifteenth year we are offering School Garden Grants to Asheville City and Buncombe County public schools, including state charter schools.

Extension Master Gardener instructs student in vegetable gardening.

Student learns vegetable gardening

We provide a notice of the application period along with instructions to all school principals, elementary through senior high. Additional information is available on our website page, 2022 School Garden Grants, where you can learn more about the guidelines for receiving a grant and get online access to the 2022 School Garden Grants Application.

All applications must be completed online. Completed applications will be accepted beginning January 7, 2022, and must be submitted no later than 9 p.m. on February 5, 2022. If you have any questions, please call the Extension Office at 828-255-5522.

We are proud of our partnership with Asheville City and Buncombe County Schools. Since 2007, we have awarded 44 School Garden Grants totaling over $45,000. These grants have involved more than 16,500 students and hundreds of teachers, parents, and community volunteers.

School gardens grow more than plants. They grow imagination and creativity. They make math and science come alive, and they build community. We hope your school will join us in 2022.

Guidelines for 2022 School Garden Grants can be found at 2022 School Garden Grants (buncombemastergardener.org)

Beekeeping School 2022
Jan 29 all-day
Henderson County Center - NC Extension

The Henderson County Beekeepers Association (HCBA) is pleased to announce the schedule for their 2022 Beekeeping School. This is one of this region’s most extensive beekeeping courses consisting of 7 classroom sessions and up to 6, but at least 2 apiary sessions (weather dependent) with over a dozen instructors from the southeast. The course objective is to prepare you to successfully care for your bees during the first year of beekeeping. The $75 fee includes a textbook, course materials, and one-year Family membership in HCBA. Those completing the class and planning to become spring 2022 beekeepers are encouraged to take advantage of HCBA’s unique mentor program. Mentors make themselves available to ‘hands-on’ support and coach those completing this course during the critical first year of beekeeping.

The class is held every Monday evening for 7 consecutive weeks beginning January 10, 2022, from 7 to 9 p.m. on Zoom and either at Henderson County Extension Office in Jackson Park or Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, 455 Research Drive in Mills River, North Carolina depending on how many people would like to meet live.
To begin enrollment in HCBA’s 2022 Bee School head over to https:/hcbeekeepers.org/ or call 828-233-5623

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library
Jan 29 all-day
online

History @ Home – Visit Virtually Western North Carolina Historical Association
Jan 29 all-day
online w/ Western North Carolina Historical Association
Deep Dive into Archives is a living exhibit shining a light on the individuals who were once enslaved at the Smith-McDowell House through primary documentation.

 

 

 

Douglas Ellington: Asheville’s Boomtown Architect presents a look at Ellington’s iconic Asheville creations along with other buildings he completed throughout his career in other cities.
HillBilly Land explores the power, prevalence, and persistence of the hillbilly stereotype from the days of its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present day.
In 1918 vs 2020, we take an in-depth look at the 1918 influenza epidemic in Western North Carolina through newspaper clippings, advertisements, ephemera, photographs, and oral history and place the events of 1918 into context with our present-day response to the coronavirus pandemic.
On this Day in WNC History Tidbit
Jan 29 all-day
online
On this Day in WNC History Tidbit
Do you follow us on social media? If not, you’ve missed our new 2021 series –
On This Day in WNC History!

Every week we explore the headlines and overlooked events that happened
on a particular day in Western North Carolina history.

Follow us on social media for more!

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ON THIS DAY in WNC history: On October 2, 1929, deputies fired into a crowd of striking workers in Marion, NC. Six were killed and even more wounded at the Marion Manufacturing Company in one of the deadliest acts of strike busting in the South.

This year marked an apogee of strikes and labor organization in southern textile mills. Eight years prior, over 100 miners were killed at the Battle of Blair Mountain in West Virginia in a period of coal clashes and unionization attempts. Later in the 1920s, many textile workers reacting to grueling and dirty work conditions under the “stretch-out” system, along with a reduction of their pay in company scrip, began organizing and demanding better conditions. Spearheaded by the National Textile Workers Union (an organization supported by the Communist Party), concurrent strikes began early in 1929 at the Bemberg-Glanzstoff Rayon Corporation in Elizabethton, Tennessee and at Loray Mills in Gastonia, North Carolina. Female employees were key to the organization of both strikes, and the latter is most famously remembered for the death of Ella May Wiggins. National Guard members, local police, and union-busting mobs were called to both of these events.

The Marion strikes (which occurred at the neighboring Clinchfield Mill as well) began July 11. Workers struck without official union support, resisting involvement by communist organizers. After frequent violence and threats, with two National Guard units present, workers returned to these mills September 11, with no raise in pay and a mandated 55-hour workweek. Marion Manufacturing Mill refused to rehire 114 of the strikers, leading to further anger. Workers struck again on October 2, and deputies were dispatched by the local sheriff. Though some details are murky, deputies shot into a crowd of strikers, killing four on site, wounding at least fifteen, with two others dying later. Nearby hospitals refused medical care to strikers, and churches of the mill village refused to administer their funerals. Eight deputies were charged, but acquitted in December. They contended the strikers were armed, but no guns were found, and the New York Times reported those killed were shot in the back.

The memory of these events will be examined in our upcoming event, Marion Mill Massacre in Memory, on Thursday, Oct 14.

Image: Raleigh News and Observer, Oct. 4, 1929

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Online Education Programs with The Preservation Society of Asheville + Buncombe County
Jan 29 all-day
online

The Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County (PSABC) was formed in 1976, with interest in preservation sparked by observance of the U. S. Bicentennial, and in response to threats to local buildings and sites posed by neglect, insensitive alteration, and large-scale transportation projects. Disinvestment in downtown, plans for the open cut through Beaucatcher Mountain, and a proposal to turn Montford Avenue into a through street connecting to U.S.19-23 spurred formation of the volunteer group, which quickly incorporated and initiated work as a community non-profit.

Online Education Programs

South Asheville Cemetery by Anne Chesky Smith

From Mountain Crafts to Arts and Crafts by Bruce Johnson

It happened on Chiles Avenue by James Vaughn

and more

SAHC YouTube Channel
Jan 29 all-day
online
Did you know that we have a YouTube Channel?

If you are unable to attend our virtual programs, please know that we record them and upload them to our SAHC YouTube Channel. Be sure to subscribe to our channel so you know when we have new content to share.

Check out this 10 minute video that highlights our active management and conservation work in the Highlands of Roan.

Snow in Your Landscape: Do’s and Don’ts
Jan 29 all-day
online

When it snows, gardeners may rejoice that a blanket of the cold stuff serves as welcome insulation during frosty weather, protecting plants from wind damage and moderating soil temperature. Of course, snow—and ice—are sometimes more destructive than helpful. Plan how to take advantage of snow’s benefits and minimize potential damage.

Tie up branches of evergreens with multiple leaders to prevent this kind of damage!

Things to do before a storm
If forecasters predict several inches of snow, preventing harm to your landscaping is easier than dealing with the aftermath.

  • Mark where your yard ends and the street begins. Putting up snow stakes may prevent snowplow damage to your street-side plantings. You can purchase commercial stakes or make your own from rebar or pressure-treated 1-inch by 1-inch wooden stakes painted orange. For our area, stakes 3 feet tall are tall enough—bury them 8- to 12-inches deep.
  • You may want to mark the location of garden paths or sidewalks to facilitate clearing them after the storm and to avoid inadvertently treading on your plantings.
  • If you have particularly vulnerable shrubs or trees, tying up branches or constructing shelters may help prevent breakage. Better yet, consider resistance to snow and ice damage when selecting trees and shrubs for your landscape (see list of more and less resistant tree species, below).
  • Think twice about using deicers before or after a storm—particularly salt-based ones—to avoid poisoning plants (see additional information about the benefits and risks of specific ice melters, below).

Minimizing damage after a storm
Your landscape may come through a storm unscathed but if not, take care to avoid causing even more damage to your plants or yourself!

  • Be careful about trying to remove snow or ice from trees and shrubs.
    • Often it is best to leave snow or ice to melt on its own.
    • Never stand under a snow or ice laden tree—branches may break unexpectedly!
    • Shaking a tree to remove snow can do more harm than good.
    • Don’t try to remove snow using downward brushing. Rather, try reaching underneath branches from a distance with a broom or pole to dislodge snow.
  • Avoid shoveling snow onto your plantings. In addition to the weight of the snow, you may be adding soil, grit, and/or gravel to your beds.
  • Consult an arborist about whether you can save severely damaged trees: https://www.treesaregood.org/findanarborist/arboristsearch 
  • Use proper pruning techniques to remove damaged branches on trees and shrubs; see first link below for more resources about pruning and other management issues.
Leave snow and ice on young trees that bend because they can often recover by themselves when the snow and ice melt.
Shoveled snow often contains material you do not want in your planting beds!
Severely damaged trees may require removal or extensive pruning.

Take time to dream!
Be sure to survey your landscape during and after a storm, not only to prevent or repair winter damage, but to evaluate where you might add winter interest in future years, and what new projects you’ll undertake this spring, summer, and fall. Happy year-round gardening!

Article by Buncombe County Extension Master GardenerSMVolunteers