A Guide to Hendersonville, NC
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Oct
21
Sun
2018
12th Annual Lynn Boggess Exhibition At The Haen Gallery @ The Haen Gallery
Oct 21 – Nov 30 all-day

The Haen Gallery, located in downtown Asheville, North Carolina, is proud to present their 12th Annual Lynn Boggess Exhibition. The exhibit will run through November.

Lynn Boggess is one of the most unique and noteworthy American landscape painters of the 21st Century. He resides in West Virginia, a state whose diverse mountains, forests, and rivers provide abundant inspiration for the artist’s plein air paintings. In place of brushes he uses palette knives and trowels to thickly layer the broad sweeping strokes and exquisite fine detail that capture all the colors of the seasons in rushing rivers, snow covered hillsides, and thick forest vegetation. Mr. Boggess’ work is recognized internationally for its incredible three-dimensional texture, rendered solely in oils. These remarkable paintings combine elements of Abstract Expressionism and Photorealism to create a style that is totally unique and original.

The Haen Gallery in Asheville is located at 52 Biltmore Avenue between City Bakery and Chestnut. There is a parking garage at the Aloft hotel across the street, another garage just up the hill, as well as street parking.

The gallery is open Monday through Saturday 11am-6pm & Sunday 12-5pm. For more information: 828-254-8577 or www.thehaengallery.com. Gallery contacts: Chris Foley, Director; Leslie Logemann, Gallery Manager.

With locations in Asheville and Brevard, The Haen Gallery offers the work of established artists whose distinctive and unique style sets it apart from ordinary and imitative efforts. Visit the website at thehaengallery.com.

A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Knit-n-Give @ Mission Rathbun House
Oct 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Are you looking for an excuse to knit or crochet for a good cause? Help make baby hats and blankets and adult hats, scarves, and slippers to support at-risk newborns and homeless adults.  Your handmade knitwear will keep our neighbors warm.  Volunteers with basic skills in knitting or crocheting are welcome. Please bring your own needles or crochet hooks and a pattern.

Check out Knit-n-Give on WLOS: http://wlos.com/news/only-on-wloscom/close-knit-group-of-women-use-their-talents-to-help-asheville-charities

 

 

Oct
22
Mon
2018
A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 22 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 22 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Introduction To Modeling The Human Figure with Leonid Siveriver @ Odyssey ClayWorks
Oct 22 @ 6:00 pm – Dec 10 @ 9:00 pm

Mondays 6-9pm
October 22- December 10

Working from a live model each week, students will hone their understanding of basic anatomy, proportions and the mechanics of movement in 3 dimensions. After first creating multiple fast sketches in clay to work out technique, students will then advance to a longer-term sculpture based on a single pose, with more attention to detail. Please join us for this exciting opportunity to work with decorated sculptor, Leonid Siveriver.

Level: All Levels
Tuition: $325 + $75 Lab & Live Model Fee

Oct
23
Tue
2018
A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 23 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 23 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Put A Lid On It with Cayce Kolstad @ Odyssey ClayWorks
Oct 23 @ 3:00 pm – Dec 11 @ 5:30 pm

Tuesdays 3-5:30pm
October 23- December 11

A good casserole bakes and presents your food beautifully and certainly impresses at potlucks. But casseroles are complex forms to create and get just right. Join Cayce as he demystifies the process step-by-step, with plenty of one-on-one instruction. Techniques demonstrated will include throwing hollow, making a tight fitting lid, and plenty of variations for knobs and handles. Soon you will be creating beautiful, functional casseroles to use and enjoy for years to come.

Level: Intermediate and Advanced
Tuition: $310 + $50 Lab Fee

Oct
24
Wed
2018
A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 24 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Oct
25
Thu
2018
A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 25 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 25 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Ceramic Tile Design and Murals with Mac McCusker @ Odyssey ClayWorks
Oct 25 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Thursdays 11am-1:30pm
October 18- December 13
No class November 22

Tile murals can beautifully enhance your kitchen, bathroom, or outside sidewalks and paths. Students will design their own ceramic tiles using the slab roller and press molds, then incorporate ideas and imagery through carving, sgraffito, Mishima, and ceramic decals. Underglazes, glazes, and firing will be covered. Finally, we will learn how to install these finished pieces indoor or outdoor.

Level: All Levels
Tuition: $310 + $50 Lab Fee

Pottery FUNdamentals For Kids Ages 8-12 with Halima Flynt @ Odyssey ClayWorks
Oct 25 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

5-weeks, October 18- November 15
Thursdays 4-6pm

Looking for a way to get creative and messy after school? Always wanted to play around on the potter’s wheel? Join Halima this fall and discover the FUNdamentals of throwing. In this class, students will learn to center clay on the wheel and the essential techniques used to craft cups, mugs, plates and bowls. Students will create and decorate their functional masterpieces and leave with a set of handmade pots to use at home!

Tuition: $225

True Home Open Mic at Flood Gallery @ Flood Gallery
Oct 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Uncensored expression: anyone is invited to step up to share song, music, poetry, comedy, rants & raves!

The most eclectic open mic around, in a welcoming gallery setting! 6 pm signup, perform 6:30-8:30 pm.

Oct
26
Fri
2018
A Sense of Place: Interpretations by Kari Morton and Lauren Rutten @ Flow Gallery
Oct 26 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Show runs through November 7
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10am – 4pm

This beautiful exhibit celebrates the works of photographer Lauren Rutten and quilter Kari Morton. What these two artists share in common are a partnership in the five-woman, artist-owned Flow Gallery in historic downtown Marshall, and a deep love of Madison County, their newly chosen home.

In 2015, Lauren and her husband Andy, traveled the US for one year searching for a home. “From the very moment I arrived in Marshall while on this journey, I had a sense of having dreamt of this place since childhood – I knew this was where I wanted to be.

I have found that my life here is not confined within four walls, so I’m very interested in reflections, when the light shines through a structure, or a barn begins to dilapidate so the outside and inside merge.

Marshall finds itself in a season of change. Many families who are moving here to homestead live alongside families who have farmed here for generations. This collection hopes to show the range of those who have come to call Marshall home, as well as the hard reality of homesteading and its immense beauty, which are in direct relationship with each other here. In this land I dig my hands in the earth and muddy my feet on the ground, while at the same time experiencing the transcendence of being and connecting to so much beyond my body. I hope those who view these photos might experience this too.”

Kari and her husband, Mike, moved to Madison County in 2012, after having lived a fairly nomadic life. They decided Madison County was the place to put down roots and call home.

“This collection is inspired by my immediate world, the things I live with and the things I see – the garden in my front yard, the chickens in the back yard, the buildings in downtown Marshall, where I spend many hours working at Flow and serving as a guardian ad litem in the county courthouse. Each of my pieces tell a story of connection, to my community, to my world. I love sharing this part of myself with others.”

Flow Gallery is located on Main Street in the historic, picturesque town of Marshall, which lies along the French Broad River, just 25 minutes north of Asheville, NC. The gallery is in its 8th year of business and showcases the work of over 65 talented, regional artists.

In Times of Seismic Sorrows @ Center for Craft
Oct 26 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

When reflecting on the current state of the environment, it seems that we have entered into times of seismic sorrows. Carbon emissions, water pollution, fracking, and changing climate patterns all point to a troubling reality with serious consequences for human and non-human populations. Through weavings, installations, sculpture, and print, artists Rena Detrixhe and Tali Weinberg (Tulsa, OK) explore the complex relationship between humans and the planet, offering insights, expressing grief, and creating space for resilience and change.

In Time of Seismic Sorrows is curated by Marilyn Zapf and organized by the Center for Craft. The Center for Craft is supported in part by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Classic World Cinema at Flood Gallery @ Flood Gallery
Oct 26 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Open donation.