Looking for things to do in Hendersonville, NC? Whether you’re a local or just passing through we’ve got loads of great tips and events to help you find your perfect adventure.

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Wednesday, June 12, 2024
The Arts for Schools Grant
Jun 12 all-day
online

The Arts for Schools Grant supports nonprofit arts organizations and qualified teaching artists in Buncombe County, enabling them to provide arts-focused performances, residencies, workshops, and field trips for students in K-12 public schools. Through 2027, grants will also support arts-focused afterschool programs and camps thanks to an investment from Dogwood Health Trust, which awarded $15 million in multi-year funding grants to support organizations across the region providing high-quality, evidence-based out-of-school-time (OST) programs that have a high impact on young people. Grants for in-school programs range from $500-$2,000, and grants for out-of-school programs (including afterschool and camps) range from $500-$5,000. The application cycle opens May 13 and closes June 17.

“Nurtured by Nature” Art Exhibition
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Village Potters Clay Center 

The Village Potters Clay Center (TVPCC), announces the opening of “Nurtured by Nature”, a special exhibit featuring new works by each of the six resident potters of TVPCC.

When you have six wildly talented, skilled, and creative artists working together, it can be a challenge to pick a singular theme for a show. But it didn’t take long before the resident potters at TVPCC realized that they each had a connection to nature, and it expressed itself in different ways in their lives and work.

Sarah Wells Rolland grew up in Florida near the water and life that grew in and around it. For this exhibit, she has created singular pieces using broad strokes through slip to emulate Water Grass, and her deliciously beautiful glazes invite you to touch. You can almost feel a soft Florida breeze!

Judi Harwood has her work already rooted deeply in nature, using corn husks, bamboo leaves, and other organic materials in her sagger fired vessels. On a recent trip to the beach, she noticed an amazing pattern in the sand from the ebb and flow of the tide dragging shells across the sand. She knew instantly that she needed to carve a similar design in her pieces for Raku and other alternate firing processes, and you will find those pieces in this exhibit.

Caroline Renée Woolard has always had a deep love for nature, in particular the forest and the element of water and the rhythm of waves. You will find these things in the movement of her slip application, and in her carved mushrooms that invite a child-like sense of wonder and joy.

Katie Meili Messersmith is a self-proclaimed math nerd, and she loves the beauty of sequencing and patterning that she achieves in her slip dot applications on her pots. She also sees this beauty of math sequencing in nature, like in the petals of flowers, and has explored this in her work in a stunning series of bowls.

Julia Mann’s work has always been inspired by her love of nature and love of season, as well as her love of women and love of Goddess. Venus of Willendorf remains a guiding influence on her work more than twenty years after carving her first form. Julia has created new Venus pieces as well as pieces inscribed with other symbols of nature that inspire her, from spider webs to trees and mountains.

Lori Theriault grew up on the edge of the woods in central Vermont, and spent many afternoons hiking in the trees, touching each bark to feel what she saw. She also spent many nights star gazing with her father, waiting for an Apollo rocket to fly overhead. Lori represents her love of trees and flowers in functional work with her wax resist designs, and she is exploring more sculptural work in her “Vincent Series” that celebrates her love of a star-filled sky and her love and admiration for Van Gogh’s impasto technique in ‘Starry Night’.

Nurtured by Nature will be on exhibit through the end of June at The Village Potters Clay Center. The gallery is open daily, 10am-5pm.

The Village Potters are Sarah Wells Rolland, Judi Harwood, Lori Theriault, Julia Mann, Katie Meili Messersmith, and Caroline Renée Woolard, along with Director of Operations, Keira Peterson. They comprise an intentional Collective of potters who share a commitment to nurture creative exploration through education, experience, and community. The Village Potters includes a fine craft gallery, a Teaching Center offering ongoing classes in wheel, hand building, and sculpture for adults, an Advanced Ceramic Studies Program, and online demonstrations and workshops. The Village Potters Clay Center is an educational member of The Craft Guild of the Southern Highlands, and is an official distributor for Laguna Clays.

Art Exhibition: Hammer and Hope
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Historians estimate that skilled Black artisans outnumbered their white counterparts in the antebellum South by a margin of five to one. However, despite their presence and prevalence in all corners of the pre-industrial trade and craft fields, the stories of these skilled workers go largely unacknowledged.

Borrowing its title from a Black culture and politics magazine of the same name, Hammer and Hope celebrates the life and labor of Black chairmakers in early America. Featuring the work of two contemporary furniture makers – Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland – the pieces in this exhibition are based on the artists’ research into ladderback chairs created by the Poynors, a multigenerational family of free and enslaved craftspeople working in central Tennessee between the early nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Through the objects featured in Hammer and Hope, Awake and Ryland explore, reinterpret, and reimagine what the field of furniture-making today would look like had the history and legacy of the Poynors – and countless others that have been subject to a similar pattern of erasure – been celebrated rather than hidden. Hammer and Hope represents Awake and Ryland’s attempts, in their own words,  “at fighting erasure by making objects that engage with these long-suppressed stories.”

Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland are recipients of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

Juneteenth Flag Collage Mosaic
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Swannanoa Library

All Month Long in June at the Swannanoa Library

Join us at the Swannanoa Library to create a collage mosaic Juneteenth Flag. While communally creating this flag, learn the history and meaning of this flag and all that it represents.  This program will continue for entire month of June where the community can add to it over time. All ages are welcome to contribute.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas features eleven textiles by acclaimed Indigenous artisanas  (artists) from Chiapas, Mexico commissioned by US-based fiber artists and activist Aram Han Sifuentes. As part of their 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship, Han Sifuentes traveled to Chiapas to understand the function of garments and textiles within the social and cultural context of the area and to learn the traditional practice of backstrap weaving. Through the works on view, combined with a series of interviews Han Sifuentes conducted during her research, visitors learn about the artisanas and their role as preservers, rescuers, and innovators of culture and as protectors of Mayan ancestral knowledge. Together, these works present an approach to connecting and learning about culture through craft practices

Han Sifuentes is interested in backstrap weaving because it is one of the oldest forms used across cultures. The vibrant hues and elaborate designs of each textile express the artisanas identities and medium to tell their stories. To understand how these values manifested in textiles made in Chiapas, Han Sifuentes invited the artisanas to create whatever weaving they desired over the course of three months.  This is unique because most textiles in the area are created to meet tourist-driven and marketplace demands. Incorporating traditional backstrap weaving and natural dye techniques, some artisans created textiles to rescue or reintroduce weaving practices that are almost or completely lost in their communities, while others were created through material and conceptual experimentation. This range of approaches reflects how artistanas are constantly innovating while at the same time honoring and keeping to tradition.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas is on view from November 17, 2023 to July 13, 2024.

Aram Han Sifuentes is a recipient of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

The featured artisanas include: Juana Victoria Hernandez Gomez from San Juan Cancuc, Maria Josefina Gómez Sanchez and Maria de Jesus Gómez Sanchez from Oxchujk (Oxchuc), Marcela Gómez Diaz and Cecilia Gómez Diaz from San Andrés Larráinzar, Rosa Margarita Enríquez Bolóm from Huixtán, Cristina García Pérez from Chalchihuitán, Susana Maria Gómez Gonzalez, Maria Gonzalez Guillén, and Anastacia Juana Gómez Gonzalez from Zinacantán, Angelica Leticia Gómez Santiz from Pantelhó, and Susana Guadalupe Méndez Santiz from Aldama

 

Regional Artists Gallery Exhibit
Jun 12 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Black Mountain Center for the Arts

May 30- June 12 • 10am-5pm, Monday-Friday • Regional Artists Gallery Exhibit

In the weeks leading up to Art in Bloom, our gallery will feature selected pieces from regional artists. The works featured will be inspiration for the arrangements created by our floral designers.

This year marks the 17th Annual Art in Bloom, our most anticipated fundraiser of the year. This multifaceted event, celebrating nature and art, combines two gallery exhibits, live floral arrangements, and a local garden tour featuring working artists. Whether you join us for one event or all of them, you are playing an important role in supporting the arts in our community.

 

 Events

May 30- June 12 • 10am-5pm, Monday-Friday • Regional Artists Gallery Exhibit

In the weeks leading up to Art in Bloom, our gallery will feature selected pieces from regional artists. The works featured will be inspiration for the arrangements created by our floral designers.

June 13 • 5-7pm • Art in Bloom Preview Party Preview Party (includes Gallery Exhibit, drinks and hor’d’oeuvres) – $45

We know how to throw a party! Be among the first to see the floral interpretations at their freshest and meet the floral designers. We’ll kick off Art in Bloom with drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and music. This is a night you won’t want to miss.

June 14 & 15 • 10am-4pm • Tour the Gallery & Floral Arrangements

Visit the gallery to experience the stunning creativity of our Ikebana and Western floral designers who have created arrangements inspired by the artworks in the show. The flowers will only be on display for 2 days, so don’t miss your chance to see nature imitating art!

June 14 & 15 • 10am-2pm • Local Garden Tour & Plein Air Artists

Our self-guided tour features a diverse array of inspiring local gardens. Look for plein air artists creating in each garden! Your Garden Tour Ticket includes a map and directions to each garden and access to our main gallery for the Art in Bloom exhibit.

June 21 • 5-6:30pm • Art from the Garden Opening Reception

Return to BMCA after Art in Bloom to view the works created during the Garden Tour by the plein air artists. Enjoy complimentary refreshments and mingle with the artists during the last leg of Art in Bloom’s festivities.

June 21 – July 16 • 10am-5pm, Monday-Friday • Art from the Garden Exhibit

Can’t make it to the opening? Stop by during this time to visit the Art from the Garden. This beautiful show is free and open to the public.

***

Art in Bloom is a unique exhibition that also serves as a fundraiser for the Black Mountain Center for the Arts. Every ticket you purchase supports local artists, programming, and creative opportunities in Western North Carolina.

Art in Bloom Gallery Exhibit – $5

Garden Tour & Gallery Exhibit -$30

 

Art in Bloom Everything Pass (includes Preview party, Garden Tour, and Exhibit) – $65

Art Exhibit: Dusk till Dawn
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Blue Spiral 1 Gallery

May 3 – June 26, 2024 MON – SAT 11 – 6SUN 11 – 5

Artists: Caleb Clark, Bryant Holsenbeck, Bill Killebrew, Inigo Navarro, Isaac Payne, Amy Putansu, Daniel Robbins, Peggy Root, and Deborah Squier.

This group exhibition features paintings, collages, and sculptures that embody the alluring ambiance between sunrise and sunset. Plein air paintings capture the scattered, sleepy light of Dawn; Collaged drawings depict sidewalks blanketed by moonlight; Mixed-media sculptures portray nocturnal animals. Each artist reminds us of the recurrent and striking period of time when the atmosphere is neither totally dark, nor completely lit.

Honoring Nature: Early Southern Appalachian Landscape Painting
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

In the early 1900s, travel by train and automobile became more accessible in the United States, leading to an increase in tourism and a revitalized interest in landscape painting. The relative ease of transportation, as well as the creation of National Parks, allowed people to experience the breathtaking landscapes of the United States in new ways. Artists traveled along popular routes, recording the terrain they encountered.

This exhibition explores the sublime natural landscapes of the Smokey Mountains of Western North Carolina and Tennessee. While there were several regional schools of painting around this time, this group is largely from the Midwest and many of the artists trained at the Art Institute of Chicago or in New York City. Through their travels, they captured waterfalls, sunsets, thunderstorms, autumn foliage, lush green summers, and snow-covered mountains—elements that were novel for viewers from cities and rural areas. Though some of these paintings include people, they are usually used for scale and painted with little to no detail, highlighting the magnificence of nature.

Rudolph F. Ingerle, Mirrored Mountain, not dated, oil on canvas, 28 × 32 inches. Courtesy of Allen & Barry Huffman, Asheville Art Museum.

Robert Chapman Turner: Artist, Teacher, Explorer
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

Robert Turner (1913-2005) arrived at Black Mountain College in 1949 to establish the first studio pottery program at the College. He worked with student architect Paul Williams to design the Potshop and stayed until 1951 as a teacher and potter. There he formed lifelong friendships with M.C. Richards, Joe Fiore, and Natasha Goldowski Renner, and was part of the lively mix of art and ideas generated by Clement Greenberg, Katherine Litz, Kenneth Noland, Theodoros Stamos, and many others. Turner’s education prior to his arrival at Black Mountain included Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, The Barnes Foundation, Penland School of Crafts, and Alfred University.

After Black Mountain, Turner and his family moved to Alfred Station, NY where they bought a farm, and he established a successful studio pottery practice and actively exhibited his work in galleries across the U.S. In 1958 he began teaching pottery and sculpture at Alfred University where he would lead the ceramics program until his retirement in 1979. In addition to his influential teaching position at Alfred, Turner taught at Penland, Haystack, and Anderson Ranch helping a new generation of artists and potters develop their work and establishing his own reputation as a gifted teacher.

Robert Turner’s travels to Africa and to the American Southwest proved to be important life experiences and important to his growth as an artist. Over his lifetime he received many awards for his work, but his humble, gentle demeanor and Quaker background helped keep him centered while also remaining open to exploration and discovery in nature and life.

The exhibition will include work by some of Turner’s students and colleagues at BMC, Alfred University, and Penland as well as work by contemporary ceramic artists whose work fits within the context of the show. Artists include: Meredith Brickell, Cynthia Bringle, Marjorie Dial, Cynthia Homire, Bill C. Jones, Bobby Kaddis, Karen Karnes, Eric Knoche, Jeannine Marchand, Neil Noland, Daniel Rhodes, M.C. Richards, Gay Smith, Tom Spleth, Adele Suska, Lydia C. Thompson, Xavier Toubes, Jerilyn Virden, Peter Voulkos, David Weinrib, and Kensuke Yamáda.

I wanted to work with clay so that the way it moved, the vitality of clay, is not meeting something that’s been on the drawing board. It’s using clay with abstraction to start with and then seeing what it’s going to do, how it will move and change, and always surprise you.

Curated by Alice Sebrell, Director of Preservation

Shifting Perceptions: Photographs from the Collection
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Shifting Perceptions: Photographs from the Collection, on view through May 17—September 23, 2024. Shifting Perceptions is guest-curated by Katherine Ware, curator of photography at the New Mexico Museum of Art, and continues the Museum’s 75th-anniversary celebration and highlights its expanding Collection.
Featuring over 125 photographs, the exhibition showcases works by 20th-century masters such as Ruth Bernhard, Bruce Davidson, Donna Ferrato, Carrie Mae Weems, and Jerry Uelsmann, alongside contemporary images by Jess T. Dugan, Matthew Pillsbury, and Cara Romero, among others. While some photographs offer a distinct point of view, many invite contemplation of the intersections and contradictions within each category. Recent acquisitions and longtime favorites are presented in new juxtapositions, providing fresh insights into the evolving landscape of photography.
The New Salon: A Contemporary View
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Bender Gallery Artists

Featured in

Asheville Art Museum Exhibition

The New Salon: A Contemporary View

The Asheville Art Museum will be opening their exhibit, The New Salon: A Contemporary View, on March 8 and it will run until August 19, 2024. The New Salon offers a modern take on the prestigious tradition of the Parisian Salon with the diversity and innovation of today’s art world. Guest-curated by Gabriel Shaffer, the show will include works from Pop Surrealism, Outsider Art, Street Art, and Graffiti genres.

 

Bender Gallery has been collaborating with the Asheville Art Museum to loan four paintings from three of our artists. The artists are Laine Bachman, Kukula, and Yui Sakamoto. Be sure to check out this special exhibition in downtown Asheville.

Learn More

Kukula, Impossible Voyage, oil on board, 48 x 24 inches

Kukula (b. 1980, Israel)

Nataly Abramovitch, better known in the art world as, Kukula, paints imagined worlds filled with elaborately dressed women in fanciful settings. The artist does extensive research on the layouts of paintings from the Renaissance and Rococo periods. Kukula subverts these images by depicting women characters in place of traditionally male positions and settings. Her characters are powerful, commanding, and have an air of indifference.

Available Work

Yui Sakamoto, Self Portrait, oil on canvas, 63 x 63 inches

Yui Sakamoto (b. 1981, Japan)

Our surrealist artist, Yui Sakamoto, will have two paintings featured including My Soul and Self Portrait. Self Portrait is still available from his recent solo exhibition at Bender Gallery. Standing in front of Self Portrait, one is immersed in the dual-worlds of Sakamoto’s Japanese and Mexican cultures. There is a sense of calm reflected in the repeating rose pattern, mixed with the uneasy realization that the coral, fungi, and otherworldly forms are what makeup the figure.

Available Work

Laine Bachman, Night Bloomers, acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24 inches

Laine Bachman (b. 1974, USA)

Our prolific Magical Realism artist, Laine Bachman, makes a feature in the exhibition with her painting, Night Bloomers. She has been hard at work making 17 new pieces for her solo exhibition at the Canton Art Museum in Canton, Ohio. The Canton show opens on April 28 and continues through to July 28, 2024.

Available Work
The Shape of Water
Jun 12 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Margie Kluska

When one thinks of the necessities of life, one element immediately comes to mind: water. When one thinks of modern abstraction, the dynamic realm of contemporary art where boundaries are blurred and creativity knows no limits, one name shines brightly: Patricia Hargrove.

The Asheville Gallery of Art proudly presents its June exhibit of Hargove’s series that depicts the powers of water to energize, refresh and heal the soul and body. This masterful exhibit runs June 1-30, with an opening reception on Friday, June 7 from 5-7:30pm. Everyone is welcome.

Reflecting on Equality: New Photo Exhibit to Honor 10 Years of Same-Sex Marriage in Buncombe County
Jun 12 @ 5:15 pm – 6:45 pm
Buncombe County’s Register of Deeds office

An upcoming exhibit provides a local vignette of national history in the making. Ten years ago, a federal lawsuit in Buncombe County ended a ban on same-sex marriage in North Carolina. Buncombe County’s Register of Deeds office is commemorating the occasion with a photography display honoring couples who protested for their equal protections under the law. “Leading up to that ruling, I’d had the awful duty of upholding the state’s bigoted law, knowing it was immoral and unjust,” recalls Register of Deed Drew Reisinger. However, as soon as news of the ruling was announced, Drew kept his office open late for the crowd of people that had gathered in the lobby. “We quickly earned the reputation as a welcoming, friendly place where same-sex couples could obtain their marriage license. The love and joy evident in that lobby was one of the most beautiful scenes no one in that room will ever forget.”

During this momentous occasion, photographer Max Cooper had been covering protests and his amazing photography documents the emotional moment when the law changed. You can view this exhibit will be on display in the hallway of the Register of Deeds office through the end of 2024. There will be a public reception for the exhibit’s opening on Wednesday, June 12 at 5:15 p.m. at the Register of Deeds’ office (205 College St., Asheville).

Q&A with Drew and Max
The Register of Deeds holds an elected office, and the views expressed in this are Q&A personal. 

We asked Drew and Max a few questions about their experience witnessing this historical event.

Looking back, what was your reaction to the end of the same-sex marriage ban 10 years ago? How did people looking for same-sex marriage certificates react? 
Drew Reisinger: Leading up to that ruling, I’d had the awful duty of upholding the state’s bigoted law, knowing it was immoral and unjust. A little after 5 p.m. on Friday, October 10, Jasmine Beach-Ferrara was telling the large crowd who had gathered that day that there would likely not be a ruling until the following week. I had the distinct pleasure of interrupting my friend to announce to the crowd that Judge Cogburn had made a ruling and the whole lobby erupted into tears of joy that so many in that room had waited a lifetime to shed. We kept the office open late that night and quickly earned the reputation as a welcoming, friendly place where same sex couples could obtain their marriage license. The love and joy evident in that lobby was one of the most beautiful scenes no one in that room will ever forget.

Why is hosting this exhibit important for you and the public? 
Max Cooper: The 10th anniversary of this event is a time to remember that this landmark decision happened in downtown Asheville, in Buncombe County offices. A federal judge in Asheville made the ruling. The plaintiffs in the case were based in a church next door to the Register of Deeds’ office and went on to be couples and officiants in history-making weddings performed on that office’s steps.

In the 10 years since this happened, what do you see that has changed and what still needs to change?  
Max Cooper: As a wedding photographer, I’m glad to say that Asheville’s wedding scene was quick to embrace marriage equality, and an inclusive and affirming attitude is universal among the venues and vendors with whom I work. Unfortunately, this is not the case in society at-large. Many of the proponents of Amendment One still hold office and political influence. One of our major political parties is running an openly bigoted candidate for North Carolina governor. These attitudes in public office are unacceptable after the courts have repeatedly affirmed marriage equality.

Would you like to say anything else about this exhibit?
Drew Reisinger: We are excited to host Max Cooper’s beautiful documentary photographs that captured the tension leading up to the law being overturned as well as the historic moments when the law was struck down. In celebration of Pride Month, we welcome all residents to come visit the gallery at 205 College St.

Poetry 101: The Curious Practice of Paying Attention
Jun 12 @ 6:30 pm – Jul 10 @ 8:30 pm
Story Parlor

5 week series. Every Wednesday from 6:30-8:30, beginning June 5. Class cancelled July 3. Ending July 10.

Poetry is the written act of paying attention. Paying attention to words, rhythm, and writing but most importantly the worlds that inspire you to write. Namely, your world.

“Wanted: a needle swift enough to sew this poem into a blanket.” -Charles Simic

Have you ever swooned at the thought of exploring your full expression, only to shuffle around the house more determined to rearrange mothballs than get something on paper?

Poetry is undoubtedly a practice, but it doesn’t have to be an intimidating sport for Creative Gods alone. The only “ask” is to take note and notice of your life.

We’ll help develop the work itself, together.

This full-bodied beginner’s poetry class will help you shift from “Oof, I could never…” into “Wait, where’s my journal?!” by tuning into your world: to the color palette of grass, to coffee-shop conversation, to the twitch in your left elbow. If you want language for the volcanic prayers of your soul or to describe your partner’s voice whispering “I love you” at 4am, we’ll get there. This class weaves the elements of poetry, forms of poetry, guided discussion with peers, and the works of prolific poets all into a multidisciplinary play space. Plus, oodles (oodles!) of writing time to build personal confidence and craft. This class immerses itself in artful experimentation across mediums, paired with a toolkit of technical writing skills. It’s the ultimate permission slip to be a beginner.

“Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance.” -Carl Sandburg

Thursday, June 13, 2024
Arts Discounts Page
Jun 13 all-day
online w/ ArtsAVL
LEAF SUMMER CAMPS registration open
Jun 13 – Jun 12 all-day
LEAF Global Arts

LEAF Schools & Streets invites your students to join us at LEAF Global Arts for summer camps, which run June 17-August 23 at 19 Eagle Street downtown. Registration is open!

Most camps are for rising first-graders through rising sixth-graders, with the addition of the ‘Making a Music Video’ and ‘Songwriting and Recording’ camps for middleschoolers and highschoolers.

SUMMER CAMPS

• June 17-21 – World Dance

• June 24-28 – West African Culture: Drumming, Dance, Clothing & Food

• July 8-12 – Blues

• July 15-19 – LEAF International Haiti

• July 22-25 – Making a Music Video: Songwriting, Recording, and Film-Making*

• July 29-August 2 – Stop Motion Animation

• August 12-15 – Songwriting and Recording*

• August 19-23 – World-Changing Visual Art

*middle and high school, all others are rising 1st-6th

The Arts for Schools Grant
Jun 13 all-day
online

The Arts for Schools Grant supports nonprofit arts organizations and qualified teaching artists in Buncombe County, enabling them to provide arts-focused performances, residencies, workshops, and field trips for students in K-12 public schools. Through 2027, grants will also support arts-focused afterschool programs and camps thanks to an investment from Dogwood Health Trust, which awarded $15 million in multi-year funding grants to support organizations across the region providing high-quality, evidence-based out-of-school-time (OST) programs that have a high impact on young people. Grants for in-school programs range from $500-$2,000, and grants for out-of-school programs (including afterschool and camps) range from $500-$5,000. The application cycle opens May 13 and closes June 17.

“Nurtured by Nature” Art Exhibition
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Village Potters Clay Center 

The Village Potters Clay Center (TVPCC), announces the opening of “Nurtured by Nature”, a special exhibit featuring new works by each of the six resident potters of TVPCC.

When you have six wildly talented, skilled, and creative artists working together, it can be a challenge to pick a singular theme for a show. But it didn’t take long before the resident potters at TVPCC realized that they each had a connection to nature, and it expressed itself in different ways in their lives and work.

Sarah Wells Rolland grew up in Florida near the water and life that grew in and around it. For this exhibit, she has created singular pieces using broad strokes through slip to emulate Water Grass, and her deliciously beautiful glazes invite you to touch. You can almost feel a soft Florida breeze!

Judi Harwood has her work already rooted deeply in nature, using corn husks, bamboo leaves, and other organic materials in her sagger fired vessels. On a recent trip to the beach, she noticed an amazing pattern in the sand from the ebb and flow of the tide dragging shells across the sand. She knew instantly that she needed to carve a similar design in her pieces for Raku and other alternate firing processes, and you will find those pieces in this exhibit.

Caroline Renée Woolard has always had a deep love for nature, in particular the forest and the element of water and the rhythm of waves. You will find these things in the movement of her slip application, and in her carved mushrooms that invite a child-like sense of wonder and joy.

Katie Meili Messersmith is a self-proclaimed math nerd, and she loves the beauty of sequencing and patterning that she achieves in her slip dot applications on her pots. She also sees this beauty of math sequencing in nature, like in the petals of flowers, and has explored this in her work in a stunning series of bowls.

Julia Mann’s work has always been inspired by her love of nature and love of season, as well as her love of women and love of Goddess. Venus of Willendorf remains a guiding influence on her work more than twenty years after carving her first form. Julia has created new Venus pieces as well as pieces inscribed with other symbols of nature that inspire her, from spider webs to trees and mountains.

Lori Theriault grew up on the edge of the woods in central Vermont, and spent many afternoons hiking in the trees, touching each bark to feel what she saw. She also spent many nights star gazing with her father, waiting for an Apollo rocket to fly overhead. Lori represents her love of trees and flowers in functional work with her wax resist designs, and she is exploring more sculptural work in her “Vincent Series” that celebrates her love of a star-filled sky and her love and admiration for Van Gogh’s impasto technique in ‘Starry Night’.

Nurtured by Nature will be on exhibit through the end of June at The Village Potters Clay Center. The gallery is open daily, 10am-5pm.

The Village Potters are Sarah Wells Rolland, Judi Harwood, Lori Theriault, Julia Mann, Katie Meili Messersmith, and Caroline Renée Woolard, along with Director of Operations, Keira Peterson. They comprise an intentional Collective of potters who share a commitment to nurture creative exploration through education, experience, and community. The Village Potters includes a fine craft gallery, a Teaching Center offering ongoing classes in wheel, hand building, and sculpture for adults, an Advanced Ceramic Studies Program, and online demonstrations and workshops. The Village Potters Clay Center is an educational member of The Craft Guild of the Southern Highlands, and is an official distributor for Laguna Clays.

Art Exhibition: Hammer and Hope
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Historians estimate that skilled Black artisans outnumbered their white counterparts in the antebellum South by a margin of five to one. However, despite their presence and prevalence in all corners of the pre-industrial trade and craft fields, the stories of these skilled workers go largely unacknowledged.

Borrowing its title from a Black culture and politics magazine of the same name, Hammer and Hope celebrates the life and labor of Black chairmakers in early America. Featuring the work of two contemporary furniture makers – Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland – the pieces in this exhibition are based on the artists’ research into ladderback chairs created by the Poynors, a multigenerational family of free and enslaved craftspeople working in central Tennessee between the early nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Through the objects featured in Hammer and Hope, Awake and Ryland explore, reinterpret, and reimagine what the field of furniture-making today would look like had the history and legacy of the Poynors – and countless others that have been subject to a similar pattern of erasure – been celebrated rather than hidden. Hammer and Hope represents Awake and Ryland’s attempts, in their own words,  “at fighting erasure by making objects that engage with these long-suppressed stories.”

Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland are recipients of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

Juneteenth Flag Collage Mosaic
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Swannanoa Library

All Month Long in June at the Swannanoa Library

Join us at the Swannanoa Library to create a collage mosaic Juneteenth Flag. While communally creating this flag, learn the history and meaning of this flag and all that it represents.  This program will continue for entire month of June where the community can add to it over time. All ages are welcome to contribute.